Charles James Fox: a Man for the People

Charles James Fox: a Man for the People

Charles James Fox: a Man for the People

Charles James Fox: a Man for the People

Excerpt

The most pleasant part of writing this book has been the association with knowledgeable and gracious people who have extended their assistance.

Fox letters and documents are found in more than twenty different collections. I am particularly indebted to the trustees and staff of the British Museum for their unfailing courtesy in placing at my disposal, and in permitting me to quote from, the Fox and more recently the Holland House manuscripts. I also used the Museum's Burney collection of newspapers and those at the Colindale branch, an indispensable. I am indebted to Earl Fitzwilliam and Earl Fitzwilliam's Wentworth Estates Company, and the City Librarian, for permission to quote from the Wentworth Woodhouse Muniments at the Sheffield City Library and from the Fitzwilliam (Milton) collection in the Northamptonshire Record Office, Delapré Abbey. At the Public Record Office I read Admiralty and Treasury papers and also Foreign Office records dealing with treaty negotiations of 1783 and 1806. I have seen other materials through the courtesy of L. W. Hanson, keeper of printed books at the Bodleian Library, andR. G. Chapman, compiler of an invaluable index of major historical periodicals. J. E. Fagg, Reader, University of Durham, supplied copies of the Fox-Grey correspondence; the Probate Registry, Somerset House, provided copies of Fox's will and that of his wife. D. F. Cook, curator of Special Collections, University Library, Liverpool; J. H. Hudson, keeper of the manuscripts, University of Nottingham, and other librarians of British universities called attention to incidental Fox letters. For these courtesies I am deeply grateful.

A substantial quantity of Fox correspondence and related materials is available in the United States. The extensive collection of eighteenth- century materials on deposit at the William L. Clements Library of the University of Michigan is of the highest importance, and the courtesies extended by Howard H. Peckham, director, and William S. Ewing, curator of manuscripts, made my stay there a fruitful one. John E. Pomfret, director of the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery, and members of his staff, guided me through the extensive holdings of that institution to important Fox papers. The James M. Osborn collection of Fox letters, housed at the Beinecke Library, Yale University, is a select one; I am indebted to Dr Osborn for permission to consult these papers and to the librarian of the collection, George A. M. Wood, for putting them at my disposal. The Princeton University Library, the Miriam Lutcher Stark Library of the University of Texas . . .

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