Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland with the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers: With the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers

Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland with the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers: With the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers

Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland with the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers: With the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers

Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland with the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers: With the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers

Excerpt

It is a singular circumstance, that, with the exception of a transcript of the sixteenth century, no ancient manuscript of Ingulph's Chronicle is known to exist. After the dissolution of the Monasteries, a manuscript, which had the reputation of being an autograph of Ingulph, remained for many years in the church at Croyland, where it was preserved with great care in a chest locked with three keys. Selden endeavoured in vain to gain access to it, and when Fulman made enquiries (probably about 1680), it could no longer be found. Two ancient copies, however, are known to have formerly existed: one, in the possession of Sir J. Marsham, which was the basis of Fulman's edition; and another, from which Selden published the Laws of the Conqueror, was in the Cottonian Library, and burnt in the fire of 1731. Marsham's copy has long since disappeared. Spelman states, erroneously no doubt, that he consulted the autograph itself, and from it transcribed a portion of the Norman laws.

For many years after the publication of Ingulph, there seems to have been no suspicion that any portion of the work, or the Charters contained in it, were other genuine. The Charters are quoted as such by Sir H. Spelman, and Sir W. Dugdale in the Monasticon, and Selden and Stillingfleet rely upon the authority of the work. From the time, however, of Henry Wharton, who detected certain anachronisms in the attestations of earlier Saxon Charters, doubts have been very generally entertained as to the genuineness of the documents, and by some as to that of the history itself. Wharton's enquiries were continued at very con-

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