Canada and the Law of Nations: A Selection of Cases in International Law, Affecting Canada or Canadians, Decided by Canadian Courts, by Certain of the Higher Courts in the United States and Great Britain and by International Tribunals

Canada and the Law of Nations: A Selection of Cases in International Law, Affecting Canada or Canadians, Decided by Canadian Courts, by Certain of the Higher Courts in the United States and Great Britain and by International Tribunals

Canada and the Law of Nations: A Selection of Cases in International Law, Affecting Canada or Canadians, Decided by Canadian Courts, by Certain of the Higher Courts in the United States and Great Britain and by International Tribunals

Canada and the Law of Nations: A Selection of Cases in International Law, Affecting Canada or Canadians, Decided by Canadian Courts, by Certain of the Higher Courts in the United States and Great Britain and by International Tribunals

Excerpt

Oh, ye'll tak' the high road an' I'll tak' the low road, An' I'll be in Scotland before ye; . . .

These words of the Scottish ballad might be fittingly applied to Canada and the British Colonies to the south, for the latter, taking the "low road," so to speak, in 1776, declared their independence of George III and his friends, while Canada, unwilling to follow their example, kept to the "high road." Today, however, Canada, without resort to arms, is to all intents and purposes an independent nation of the international community, but with a last road yet to travel, the road to the southward leading to the Union of American Republics. Indeed, so far has Canada proceeded on the high road to independence that two Canadians with Scotch names, Norman MacKenzie and Lionel H. Laing, have now prepared a case book on International Law for their country and its citizens under the title, Canada and the Law of Nations, with a Foreword by a former distinguished Prime Minister of the Dominion, the late Sir Robert Borden. Perhaps it is not immaterial to mention that the writer of this brief Introduction was himself born in Canada, of Scottish parents, and, notwithstanding the fact that he is a loyal citizen of the United States, he has nevertheless not only a deep interest, but also an affection for Canada and things Canadian, and because of this interest and affection he is especially happy to say a word in behalf of this notable undertaking.

It may seem strange to the uninitiated--meaning in this connection the good people of the United States--that an elaborate case book on the Law of Nations, composed largely of cases decided by Canadian courts, should also include cases decided--to quote from the sub-title--"by certain of the higher courts in the United States and Great Britain and by international tribunals." In their Preface, however, the editors have amply justified their inclusion of cases from non-Canadian jurisdictions. Thus of cases decided by courts of the United States they have chosen those which have reference to Canada as well as to the United States. It was but natural also that they should include cases originally decided in Canada but subsequently passed upon by the Judicial Committee . . .

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