The Man Who Cried Genocide: An Autobiography

The Man Who Cried Genocide: An Autobiography

The Man Who Cried Genocide: An Autobiography

The Man Who Cried Genocide: An Autobiography

Synopsis

Highlights from the remarkable life of a participant in the Sacco-Vanzetti and Scottsboro cases, who founded the Civil Rights Congress and presented the historic petition We Charge Genocide to the UN in 1951. A new edition, with a section of the famous petition "We Charge Genocide." Index.

Excerpt

My mother often talked to us about her childhood on the Virginia plantation where she was born as a slave in 1850 and had lived until she was ten. It was in cotton lands not far from Norfolk--she knew that because her grandfather, who often drove to the "big city," was seldom gone for long. Her father, William Galt, was a slave who belonged to the owner of an adjacent plantation, and as a child she saw very little of him. As coachman for his master--who was also his father--he drove back and forth on visits to the Turner plantation, where he met and later married my grandmother, Elizabeth Mary Turner.

The big house was set back from the magnolia-lined plantation road leading to the main highway to Norfolk. But my mother lived in the slave quarters, which were quite some distance back from the manor house. Here, separated from her mother and grandmother, she lived with older slave women who were part of the crew that served the master's immediate household.

My grandmother was personal maid to the white wife of her father and master; my great-grandmother was head of the house slaves and also her owner's slave woman (at that time the word "mistress" was not used in this sense). My mother had learned of her grandmother's role from gossip among the field . . .

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