Heredity and Eugenics: A Course of Lectures Summarizing Recent Advances in Knowledge in Variation, Heredity, and Evolution, and Its Relation to Plant, Animal, and Human Improvement and Welfare

Heredity and Eugenics: A Course of Lectures Summarizing Recent Advances in Knowledge in Variation, Heredity, and Evolution, and Its Relation to Plant, Animal, and Human Improvement and Welfare

Read FREE!

Heredity and Eugenics: A Course of Lectures Summarizing Recent Advances in Knowledge in Variation, Heredity, and Evolution, and Its Relation to Plant, Animal, and Human Improvement and Welfare

Heredity and Eugenics: A Course of Lectures Summarizing Recent Advances in Knowledge in Variation, Heredity, and Evolution, and Its Relation to Plant, Animal, and Human Improvement and Welfare

Read FREE!

Excerpt

During the summer of 1911, a course of lectures on heredity and allied topics was given at the University of Chicago, under the auspices of the biological departments. The purpose of the course was to present the recent developments of knowledge in reference to variation, heredity, and evolution, and the application of this new knowledge to plant, animal, and human development and improvement.

The lectures were not intended for those trained in biology, but for a general university audience, interested in the progress of genetics as a matter of information rather than of study. The lecturers, therefore, did not address themselves to their colleagues, and did not attempt to include any considerable amount of new material. It is believed that a much larger audience than the one originally addressed might be interested in this summary of results in one of the important and recently cultivated fields of biology, and therefore this volume has been published. It is hoped that it may perform a service not only for those interested in biology as a field outside their own experience, but also for those biologists whose work deals with other phases of biology.

The lectures were given by five lecturers, with no opportunity to relate the lectures to one another other than as suggested by the assigned titles. It is inevitable that there should be more or less overlapping of statements, and no attempt has been made to avoid this. Each lecture, therefore, is complete in itself, as it was delivered.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.