Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping

Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping

Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping

Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping

Synopsis

Describes and analyses the propaganda and violence of the four Cambodian parties to the 1991 Paris peace agreements. This volume explores Cambodia during the UNTAC period and sets the events within the larger context of Khmer politics, history and culture.

Excerpt

The essays that follow provide a nuanced view of politics, propaganda, and violence in Cambodia. They focus on the period of the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia, better known as untac. the collection does great credit to its seven authors, who are all Cambodia specialists and former untac employees. Their work also opens up several interesting lines of inquiry. For example, after reading the collection, we might well ask: How much of what is described can be called "traditional" and how much was contingent on UNTAC? What role, if any, did Cambodian culture play in the country's turbulent recent history? Did Cambodians' ideas of politics, violence, and information alter in the untac era? the volume poses fresh questions, also, about links among ethnicity, violence, and nationalism, the nature of propaganda, the notion of human rights, and the responses of the Khmer Rouge to the Paris agreements.

The essays fit comfortably together, I think, because of the closely related questions they pose and because of the authors' professionalism and esprit de corps. Trained as academics, these men and women were participant-observers in the unfolding (some would say unraveling) drama they discuss. the teamwork displayed in the book reflects their period of working closely together.

In the untac period, their expertise was rare. Very few people associated with untac had any prior experience in Cambodia, linguistic expertise, or an abiding interest in the country.

Throughout 1992, at least, many untac officials paid a price for this shortcoming. They spent several months on a learning curve that could have been smoothed out by asking a few questions, hiring some knowledgeable people, and reading a few books.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.