Asia, Case Studies in the Social Sciences: A Guide for Teaching

Asia, Case Studies in the Social Sciences: A Guide for Teaching

Asia, Case Studies in the Social Sciences: A Guide for Teaching

Asia, Case Studies in the Social Sciences: A Guide for Teaching

Synopsis

The material in this study is covered by Myron L. Cohen on religion and family organization in China; John R. Bowen on family, kinship, and Islam in Indonesia; Robert W. Hefner on hierarchy and stratification in Java; and Nancy Rosenberger on gender roles in Japan. Further material is provided by William W. Kelly on rural society in Japan; Theodore C. Bestor on urban life in Japan; Stephen R. Smith on the family in Japan; Doranne Jacobson on gender relations in India; Lawrence A. Babb on religion in India; Owen M. Lynch on stratification, inequality, and the caste system in India; Laurell Kendall on changing gender relations in Korea; Andrew G. Walder on comparative revolution in China and Vietnam, Maoism, and the sociology of work in China and Japan; Moni Nag on the comparative demography of China, Japan, and India; and Helen Hardacre on the new religions of Japan. Other contributors offering information through case studies are Hiroshi Ishida on stratification and mobility in Japan; Robert C. Liebman on work and education compared in Japan and the US; Joseph W. Elder on education, urban society, urban problems, and industrial society in India; Andrew J. Nathan on totalitarianism, authoritarianism, and democracy in China; Jean C. Oi on mobilisation and participation in China; Edwin A. Winckler on political development in Taiwan; Carl H. Lande on political parties and representation in the Philippines ; Clark N. Neher on political development and political participation in Thailand; and Benedict R. O'G. Anderson on political culture, the military, and authoritarianism in Indonesia. The final chapters of this work include studies by Stephen Philip Cohen on the military in India and Pakistan; Paul R. Brass on democracy and political participation in India; T.J. Pempel on Japanese democracy and political culture, political parties and representation, and bureaucracy in Japan; Han-kyo Kim on political development in South Korea; and Thomas G. Rawski on the economies of China and Japan.

Excerpt

The Project on Asia in the Core Curriculum began in 1984 to support the introduction of material on Asia into the core curricula of undergraduate institutions throughout the country. Three "Guides for Teaching" are the result of dialogue between Asian specialists and colleagues specializing in the Western tradition who most often teach the introductory, general education courses in the various academic disciplines. No attempt has been made to stress Asia at the expense of the West. The purpose of the project is to identify themes, texts, and comparative concepts that provide avenues of entry for Asian material into core courses in history, literature, and the social sciences. We asked: "How can core courses focusing primarily on Western culture, tradition, and canon be enhanced by reference to Asian traditions?" and "Which aspects of the rich and varied Asian traditions should be brought to the attention of students?"

The guides are entitled: Asia in Western and World History, Masterworks of Asian Literature in Comparative Perspective, and Asia: Case Studies in the Social Sciences. The approximately forty essays by leading specialists in each volume suggest a range of possibilities for introducing material on Asia. The essays are arranged to provide the widest choice of approaches to meet the reader's pedagogical needs. While each of the guides is a discrete publication, together they form a series that facilitates interdisciplinary teaching: in a course on anthropology, for example, the instructor who chooses to draw upon Lawrence Babb's overview of religion in India (in Asia: Case Studies in the Social Sciences) will also find much of interest in Ainslie Embree's review of South Asian history (in Asia in Western and World History) and in Barbara Stoler Miller's introduction to the imaginative universe of Indian literature (in Masterworks of Asian Literature in Comparative Perspective).

The Project on Asia in the Core Curriculum has involved over one hundred scholars from seventy-five public and private undergraduate institutions throughout the United States. It is chaired . . .

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