Broadcasting and the Bill of Rights

Broadcasting and the Bill of Rights

Broadcasting and the Bill of Rights

Broadcasting and the Bill of Rights

Excerpt

BECAUSE of the importance of the bill and the many problems of broadcasting which are involved in its provisions, I am bringing to you several members of the staff of the National Association of Broadcasters. Each of these men is an expert in one or more branches of broadcasting. While it might have been possible for each of them to have briefed me sufficiently to testify upon all points, I am satisfied that the Committee will be better served and the subject will be more adequately analyzed by their appearance. In this connection, I wish to assure the Committee that all these officers of the National Association of Broadcasters, including myself, will be available for consultation or other assistance in any future work which may be done in the drafting of legislation concerning broadcasting. In my opinion, this legislation -- although it has been under consideration for a long time -- requires much further study and it needs friendly, intelligent, and understanding cooperation between the members of Congress, the members of the Commission and the representatives of broadcasters. Only in this way is it possible for us to come together in agreement upon language which can properly express the legislative requirements.

My testimony will be directed, particularly, to consideration of several sections of the bill which affect freedom of speech, to wit, Sections 9, 16, 17, 18 and 20. In the hearings on the White-Wheeler bill committee members expressed concern as to the possibility of encroachment on freedom of speech by the Federal Communications Commission in its administra-

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