Law and Politics in Inter-American Diplomacy

Law and Politics in Inter-American Diplomacy

Law and Politics in Inter-American Diplomacy

Law and Politics in Inter-American Diplomacy

Excerpt

Formal diplomatic intercourse represents only a part of the whole pattern of international relations. Yet all other forms of intercourse are vitally affected by these formal relations. Commercial, cultural and even political relations may be carried on, but inevitably they are restricted by the absence of diplomatic ties. In the Western Hemisphere, where the influence of the United States has been so preponderant, the existence of formal relations has been of particular importance. A Latin American government which had no diplomatic relations with the United States soon found its other channels of intercourse seriously threatened.

The various acts by which governments make known their intentions to maintain normal diplomatic relations with other governments are referred to, in the language of diplomacy, as "recognition." In more precise terminology, this would be "recognition of governments" as distinguished from "recognition of states," but since we will be concerned only with the former, the distinction need not concern us here.

It is the purpose of this chapter to show the relationship between national and domestic (private) interests of a given era and the emergence and application of two opposing doctrines related to the recognition of governments. One, which we shall call the American Doctrine, calls for the recognition of governments whenever they . . .

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