The Near East and the Great Powers

The Near East and the Great Powers

The Near East and the Great Powers

The Near East and the Great Powers

Excerpt

It should be unnecessary to justify a publication on the contemporary Near East at the present time. Though the Far East has usurped the headlines of late, all nations in Asia are vitally important as members of the free world. This is especially true of the countries of the Near East, rich in oil and strategically located. Many are the problems, internal as well as international, which beset the peoples of this region of the earth, and in the year 1951 their problems have become our problems. It is incumbent upon Americans, with our world-wide responsibilities, to better understand the peoples of the Near East. This we can do only with knowledge, sympathy, and--as Charles Malik says--with love. But it is a two-way proposition; the peoples of the Near East must also understand us. H. A. R. Gibb points out the need for mutual understanding, mutual respect, and a concept of mutual service, if we are to succeed in our relations with the Near East.

The core of the Near East is the Arab world and Israel, and we have concentrated on that core in this book. Authorities on the Near East, from the academic profession, from government, and from business, have contributed to make this publication more representative of current thinking about the area. Many problems have been left untouched, for their number is legion, but we have felt that a combination of general discussions with papers on special topics would provide a better understanding of the area as a whole. Thus topics range from the broad, philosophical discussion of Charles Malik to the detailed account of the struggle for unity in Syria and Iraq by Majid Khadduri.

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