Essays in Modern European History

Essays in Modern European History

Essays in Modern European History

Essays in Modern European History

Excerpt

For many of us who turn these leaves this luckily-caught photograph will bring back the look, the twinkle, the tone, the very afterclass setting indeed of the Morgan we have known.

Born at Dell Roy, Ohio, May 19, 1883, Professor Morgan devoted his working life to his twin loves: teaching and historical research. By education he fitted himself well for both tasks. He was graduated from Ohio University with the A.B. degree in 1909, and in the fall of that year matriculated at Harvard, where he had been awarded a university scholarship. The next year, 1910, Harvard conferred upon him the A.M. degree. Throughout 1911-1912 he was an Adams Woods Fellow and went so far towards receiving his doctorate at Harvard as to pass his Ph.D. preliminaries.

His final year at Harvard was important for Mr. Morgan in other ways because at that time the late Wilbur Abbott came to Harvard as visiting Yale professor. He interested the young Ph.D. candidate in the Queen Anne period of English history, wherein Professor Morgan was to make his greatest contributions to historical scholarship. When Abbott returned to Yale, Morgan followed in 1914 as his assistant and as Cutler Fellow. He spent the summer and greater part of the fall of 1915 in England and Holland, where he gathered materials for his dissertation. By the next year he completed his work at Yale and received his doctorate. His dissertation was awarded the Herbert Baxter Adams prize in 1919, which biennially goes to a younger man making the most scholarly contribution to the field of European history. The following year it was published with the title English Political Parties and Leaders in the Reign of Queen Anne, 1702-1710.

Late Stuart England was only one of three fields with which Professor Morgan associated himself. Studies of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France and of contemporary England occupied much of his time. His interest in electoral problems of the eighteenth century naturally carried over into the twentieth. His constant searchings for source materials made him the true peripatetic. The archivists of England, Holland, France, Austria, Germany, Italy, and Canada knew him well. The libraries of Harvard, Yale, Iowa, Texas, Michigan, California, Duke, and Chicago numbered him among the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.