The Abortion Question

The Abortion Question

The Abortion Question

The Abortion Question

Synopsis

A flash of light in a usually dark and heated arena. A balanced account of the moral, medical, emotional, social,and legal issues. Presents both sides of the pro-life/choice controversy. Gives a useful and relevant history of the controversy in the US. Much emphasis on constitutional and legal issues, and on the Supreme Court's action. For all academic, public, and legal collections. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Excerpt

When the U.S. Supreme Court effectively legalized abortion in the United States on January 22, 1973, Patrick Cardinal O'Boyle saw it as "a catastrophe for America," while abortion law reformers hailed it as a victory for reproductive freedom in America. Both before and after the Court's decision, the battle fines have been drawn between those who favor legal abortion and those who oppose it. Since the Court's decision the battle has become more intense, and the contending forces, self-named pro-life and pro- choice, have engaged in constant warfare. As one side gains some advantage, the other side gathers its forces and strives harder. The political and rhetorical battles continue to rage at the local, state, and federal levels.

Why do the battles continue, seemingly without end? It is because each side has powerful arguments and devoted adherents. One side sees itself fighting for the fife of millions of humans who are being slaughtered in the womb. The other side sees itself fighting for a woman's freedom to control her body, her childbearing decisions, and her life. These are transcendent issues. Defeat is not taken in stride with the intention of waging a fight on the next issue that comes along. Abortion is the issue, and the pro-life and pro-choice forces are engaged in a protracted struggle for the hearts and minds and votes of American policymakers and the American public.

One intention of this book is to convey the moral position of each of the contending sides and to show how morality colors the vision of each side. Because of the intensity of the abortion question and the strength of convictions, each side is often swept along by its own rhetoric. Most partisans do not grant any rationality to the arguments of their opponents, or for that matter to the opponents . . .

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