Self Processes and Development

Self Processes and Development

Self Processes and Development

Self Processes and Development

Synopsis

The study of the self--and the processes associated with the self--are at the cutting edge of research on social and personality development. This volume brings together researchers from diverse theoretical perspectives to address a wide variety of issues associated with self processes including competence, autonomy, relatedness, and attachment. As such, the book provides a unique perspective on the role of self processes in child development and the importance of emotion as an organizing aspect of the self.

Excerpt

This volume contains chapters based on papers presented at the 23rd Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology, held October 27-29, 1988, at the University of Minnesota. As has been the tradition for this annual series, the faculty of the Institute of Child Development invited internationally eminent researchers to present their work and to consider problems of mutual concern.

The theme of this volume is self processes and development. the psychological study of the self has a long history in the field of psychology. It is a study, however, which has been rediscovered in recent year as researchers attempt to grapple with views of the developing child as an active organism who plays an important role in the shaping of his or her own competencies and personality. (See Bretherton chapter on "Pouring Old Wine into New bottles.") If the child is active, how do we describe and predict that activity? If the child plays a role in organizing development, what are the organizing principles? These are questions about the self. Indeed, they are questions that William James would ascribe to the self as "I" or "knower," rather than the self as "Me" or "known." Thus they are dynamic processes, emotional and cognitive, evolving out of experience and influencing experience. the goal of this volume was to assemble a group of scholars with diverse perspectives on the dynamic organizing processes of the self.

To this end, we am fortunate to have as contributors to this volume some of the most outstanding current scholars in this area. the contributors are Inge Bretherton, James Connell and James Wellborn, Seymour Epstein, E. Tory Higgins, Ellen Skinner, and Everett Waters. in addition, L. Alan Sroufe served as coeditor of this volume and co-organizer of the 1988 symposium. He also served, along with Hazel Markus, as a discussant during the symposium.

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