The Politics of Insurgency: The Farm Worker Movement in the 1960s

The Politics of Insurgency: The Farm Worker Movement in the 1960s

The Politics of Insurgency: The Farm Worker Movement in the 1960s

The Politics of Insurgency: The Farm Worker Movement in the 1960s

Excerpt

Every theory of insurgency is ultimately rooted in an underlying theory of society--in a vision of the social world that defines the major issues for analysis and the factors that enter into useful explanations. The two approaches that have dominated recent studies of insurgency--resource mobilization theory and the various classical formulations--have drawn on different visions of society. Resource mobilization theory has drawn its primary inspiration from the conflict theory tradition of Karl Marx and Max Weber. The major issue in this vision of society has been the explanation of social change, especially the transformation of structures of economic and political power. The major explanations of insurgency, then, are cast in terms of social power: structures of dominance that contain antagonistic interests, changes in political power that create opportunities for collective action, the mobilization of resources for sustained challenges, and power struggles that bring about changes in institutional structures. At the heart of this theory is the assumption that insurgency is a ubiquitous form of political action and that it constitutes a set of rational collective actions by excluded groups to advance their interests in the context of a restrictive polity. Instirgencies emerge, develop, and succeed or fail primarily because of changes in structures of social power.

The various formulations of the classical model have drawn on quite different theoretical premises, primarily those of the structural-functionalist tradition rooted in the work of Emile Durkheim and Vilfredo Pareto and the interactionist tradition of early Chicago sociology. The major issue in these theoretical traditions has been the explanation of social order, typically in terms of functional interdependence and the emergence of shared . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.