Catholic Schools and the Common Good

Catholic Schools and the Common Good

Catholic Schools and the Common Good

Catholic Schools and the Common Good

Synopsis

It is generally agreed that students--especially those from minority and disadvantaged backgrounds--are better educated in Catholic high schools than in public high schools. This finding is intriguing, but what does it mean? These authors respond to these questions in this comprehensive look a t how Catholic high schools function.

Excerpt

This book brings together findings from a set of investigations that span almost ten years: an in-depth study of a small number of Catholic high schools, statistical analyses of large national data bases, and an exploration of the philosophical and historical roots of Catholic schools. One of our purposes in Catholic Schools and the Common Good is descriptive--to offer a portrait of Catholic high schools, a book of record at this point in their history. A second and more important aim is to examine the distinctive features of Catholic high schools and the ways in which these features combine to form supportive social environments that promote academic achievement for a broad cross section of students. For anyone who is concerned about the renewal of America's educational institutions, the organization and operation of Catholic schools offer important lessons to ponder.

This project began in the fall of 1981. Peter Holland, who had entered the doctoral program in administration at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) the year before, brought to Tony Bryk's attention a request from the National Catholic Educational Association for proposals to study effective Catholic high schools. Prior to enrolling at HGSE, Peter had been a Xaverian brother and the headmaster at St. Joseph's, a private Catholic boys' secondary school in Baltimore. Drawing on related work on effective public schools, Holland and Bryk eventually crafted a proposal to undertake a parallel investigation in the Catholic sector. The centerpiece of the study was to be an intensive examination of a small number of carefully chosen U.S. Catholic high schools. Holland and Bryk collaborated on developing the field research plan, and Ruben Carriedo joined a bit . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.