Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

Synopsis

Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities fills a gap in the study of the social and historical experiences of Asians in U. S. schools. It is the first historical work to provide American readers with information about highly individual ethnic groups rather than viewing distinctly different groups as one vague, global entity such as "Asians." The people who populate each chapter are portrayed as active participants in their history rather than as passive victims of their culture.

Each of the twelve country-specific chapters begins with a description of the kind of education received in the home country, including how widely available it was, how equal or unequal the society was, and what were the circumstances under which the emigration of children from the country occurred. The latter part of each of these chapters deals with the education these children have received in the United States. Throughout the book, instead of dwelling on a relatively narrow range of children who perform spectacularly well, the author tries to discover the educational situation typical among average students. The order of chapters is roughly chronological in terms of when the first sizable numbers of immigrants came from a specific country.

Excerpt

This is the first general history of Asian-American education. During the 1960s and 1970s, when I edited Integrated Education magazine, standard educational journals were almost entirely ignoring the rising numbers of Asian-American children. Integrated Education took it on itself to publish more articles on the subject than all other educational journals combined. Early in the 1970s, I proposed to write a two-volume history of the education of minorities in the United States, including a chapter each on Chinese Americans and Japanese Americans. No funding agency cared to finance such a large work. Finally, the Field Foundation agreed to facilitate the writing of a single volume, which required the halving of the coverage. The Asian-American material was dropped, along with a number of other significant topics. Meanwhile, I continued to include Asian-American materials in various book-length bibliographies I compiled in the past 20 years. The present work is far more comprehensive than anything I could have written in the mid-1970s about Asian-Americans. Yet, it is not meant as a final word. The time is much too soon for that.

I wish to thank the librarians at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; the California State University, Long Beach; and the University of Chicago for their unstinting help. Not any less, I am grateful to the people who operate the indispensable Inter-Library Loan System for the thoroughness and dispatch with which they responded to my cascading requests for hard-to-obtain books. Mealedey Seng and Ken Cheng, my research assistants at CSULB during 1992 to 1994, carried loads of books and reports and duplicated numerous journal articles as well as transported gallons of coffee for me. As the initial occupant of . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.