Nothing to Fear: The Selected Addresses of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1932-1945

Nothing to Fear: The Selected Addresses of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1932-1945

Nothing to Fear: The Selected Addresses of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1932-1945

Nothing to Fear: The Selected Addresses of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1932-1945

Excerpt

During the more than twelve years of his Presidency Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivered hundreds of public addresses. The word "public" is used in its literal sense, for these talks, more than anything else, characterized the almost intimate relationship the President succeeded in establishing between himself and the people of the Nation. Whenever a new program of social or economic reform was to be proposed, the President talked to the people. When the pressure of public opinion was needed to prod Congress into action, or to forestall a rising tide of Congressional opposition, the President talked to the people. Thus, every important event, every important project, every significant act of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Presidency is reflected in his speeches. They constitute a self-contained history of one of the most critical periods of the Nation.

Sixty-two of these speeches are included in this collection. It would be impertinent to say that they are the best. The President himself would have been hard put to make a selection on that basis. These addresses have been chosen because I believe they express most clearly Franklin Roosevelt's political, social and economic philosophy. They outline the chronology of the New Deal's programs for recovery and reform. They reflect the metamorphosis of the Nation's foreign policy, from extreme isolationism, as expressed by the original Neutrality Act, to the program of national defense, and finally to preparation for and participation in the war. They characterize the magnetic personality of F.D.R., and furnish the clue to his tremendous popular appeal,-- an appeal sufficiently strong to override tradition and opposition in winning a third and fourth term in office.

Although it is not the purpose here to present a biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, I believe a few background notes will help the reader to a better understanding of (1) the extent to which the President transcended his social and economic environment in becoming the champion of "the greatest good for the greatest number," (2) the sequence of events that brought him to . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.