Industrial Conflict

Industrial Conflict

Industrial Conflict

Industrial Conflict

Excerpt

This volume was conceived as an integrated and genuinely interdisciplinary approach to the issues of industrial conflict in the United States. We were interested not only in examining the dimensions of the problem but also in bringing the entire field into focus to provide perspective and insights for students and all persons actively concerned with labor-management affairs. This book aims primarily to give a mountain-peak view of the problems, with a comprehensive analysis of the determining influences and conditions that give rise to conflict and an assessment of efforts at solution. Specific research inquiries and detailed techniques employed in the conduct and control of conflict behavior remain secondary. The central purpose is rather to provide a frame of reference for thinking and research.

Since this volume is published under the auspices of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) many persons--including the members of SPSSI--may be surprised that it is not more heavily psychological in its emphasis. The decision against this was a deliberate one, dictated principally by a conviction that current social and psychological research on industrial problems suffers particularly from lack of adequate background knowledge and broad understanding of the relationships. As a matter of fact, there is extremely little writing or research by psychologists that seriously gets into the matters here examined. This we believe to be both unfortunate and temporary--unfortunate, because psychologists have distinctive potential contributions to make, and temporary, because the pressing importance of the problems is bound to exert increasing pulls upon psychologists as well as upon other social scientists. It is our hope that this book will help to accelerate psychological interest in labor-management relations. Particularly, we hope that it will stimulate thought and promote research planning oriented toward broad and realistic formulations of problems instead of research so largely at the level of finding improved techniques to augment the administrative skills of industrial management.

With these broader purposes in view, it was necessary to organize the contents of the book on a different basis from that of the usual symposium. The three editors started with the assumption that a psychologist, a sociologist, and an economist, each having special interests in the field of industrial relations, could map out the contents of the book. Accordingly, they proceeded to draw up an extensive outline of the volume which was completed in a 2-day . . .

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