The Maturing Marketplace: Buying Habits of Baby Boomers and Their Parents

The Maturing Marketplace: Buying Habits of Baby Boomers and Their Parents

The Maturing Marketplace: Buying Habits of Baby Boomers and Their Parents

The Maturing Marketplace: Buying Habits of Baby Boomers and Their Parents

Synopsis

The buying habits of baby boomers really do differ from those of their parents. The authors show how marketers can use each group's consumption patterns to reach both markets most effectively. Another insight: buying habits of these groups differ according to the product or service offered. By analyzing each cohort's buying habits in various purchasing situations, the book dramatizes the need for customized marketing strategies. Based on two national surveys conducted by the Center for Mature Studies, Georgia State University, the book will be essential for marketing professionals and their academic colleagues.

Excerpt

If you are a baby boomer, you may remember Anne Roberts, who appeared in television commercials for Charlie fragrance and National Airlines in the mid-1970s. You may even remember her in the late 1960s, when she appeared in a magazine ad for Playboy dressed as an astronaut, or perhaps in her first commercial urging women to use Johnson & Johnson Baby Shampoo with the slogan "Don't wait to have a baby to try it." What is interesting about Roberts' career as a commercial spokeswoman is that, after losing a soft drink commercial part to a younger model at age 25, she believed her career would end because of her age. Roberts has not only survived the "age scare" in the past three decades, but she is in greater demand today at age 51 than even before. in early 1998, she signed a six-figure tv and print ad deal with Procter & Gamble for Oil of Olay ProVital, a new product line for women over 50.

What has helped insulate Roberts' career is exactly the same thing she was afraid would end it: her age. An increasing number of advertisers and marketers use older models and spokespersons. Today there are more spokespersons in their 50s, 60s, and even 70s than ever before, and the familiar faces of older models continue to appear in commercials. For example, actress Jaclyn Smith, in her 50s, is appearing in ads for Rembrandt's first mouthwash and toothpaste for older consumers. At 64, Joan Collins is appearing in advertisements for Old Navy, and Jack Palance, well into his 70s, has been doing television commercials for Brut cologne.

The main factor that has been fueling the trend toward spokespersons with a few wrinkles is a major demographic trend that has been creating dramatic changes in the composition of the consumer market. We call this trend "the aging of America." Never before in the history of our . . .

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