Corporate Management in Developing Countries: The Challenge of International Competitiveness

Corporate Management in Developing Countries: The Challenge of International Competitiveness

Corporate Management in Developing Countries: The Challenge of International Competitiveness

Corporate Management in Developing Countries: The Challenge of International Competitiveness

Synopsis

Managers in developing countries, whether operating in the private or public sectors, are constantly aware of the problems of underdevelopment. Effective management of international business activities in developing countries can improve the competitiveness and development prospects of these countries and, in turn, the companies operating within them. But to do so, managers need a developing country perspective on international trade agreements, international finance, foreign exchange, and national financial management. These topics, as well as practical chapters on the management of export production, financing exports, government export programs, and international investment make this very valuable reading for executives and those interested in international business.

Excerpt

At a time when developing countries are increasingly concerned with issues of international competitiveness, this book takes as its organizing theme the question of how the effective management of international business activities in developing countries can improve the competitiveness and development prospects of these countries. in this regard, the book differs significantly from the typical book on the subject of international business that is written from the perspective of the manager in a developed country and does not see a need to examine the linkages between the competitiveness of firms and of developing nations. This is not to suggest that there is not a significant overlap between the theory and practice of international business in developing and developed countries. There clearly is such an overlap, but it is even more clear that there are important areas of difference between the pressing issues in these distinct sets of countries. This book will seek to identify and discuss both the similarities and the differences, while taking its starting point from the problems of developing countries.

This book, therefore, is not an effort to replicate existing material. Rather, it is an effort to provide information and an analytical perspective that will more readily resonate with those individuals who are interested in the issues of international business and competitiveness in the context of developing countries. These individuals include managers operating in developing countries or considering engaging in such operations, academics with an interest in developing country issues, and graduate students in international business whether in developed or developing countries.

Many colleagues have assisted me both in the development of my own ideas on the subject of international business and national competitiveness and in the production of this particular book. Louis T. Wells, Jr., of Harvard Business School has been a constant source of inspiration. My colleagues at North eastern University . . .

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