Family Constellation: Theory and Practice of a Psychological Game

Family Constellation: Theory and Practice of a Psychological Game

Family Constellation: Theory and Practice of a Psychological Game

Family Constellation: Theory and Practice of a Psychological Game

Excerpt

In this book the reader will find a theory based on ten years of clinical psychological work during which the family constellations of over 400 persons were studied. This includes the functions of each person's own sibling position, of his parents, and of his children (where possible also of his grandparents), as well as of losses within the family constellation. These elements have been integrated into a system comprising eight basic types of sibling position and sixty-four basic types of conflict possible between a person and his or her parents.

The eight basic sibling positions are presented in the form of extensive character portraits. They depict, above all, the enduring relationships to people -- men, women and children -- and the impact of incidental losses of those people, but they also outline attitudes toward authority, property, work, politics; religion, and philosophy. These portraits are composites of trends and features taken from a number of people. Hence not every detail or concrete example applies in every single case. The details and examples will help, though, to reveal the core of the portrait that has been found to be consistent in all cases of a given sibling position.

Something similar holds for the sixty-four types of conflict between people and their parents. However, only the basic aspects of these conflicts have been delineated; details have merely been sketched or have been omitted for the sake of clarity. Interpolation in cases of intermediary sibling position is also concisely presented. Interpretations of family constellations of specific clinical cases are demonstrated in several examples: these may be called the exercises. Chapters on symbolic notation and quantitative treatment of major aspects of family constellation round out the book.

It is likely that the reader will discover some of his friends, relatives, family members, and even himself in this' book. Some of the psychological problems and puzzles in his relationships with them may appear in a new light. Before long he may find himself thinking in terms of family constellations; with their help he may . . .

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