The Revolution in Philosophy

The Revolution in Philosophy

The Revolution in Philosophy

The Revolution in Philosophy

Excerpt

The wise rambler occasionally, though not incessantly, looks back over his shoulder in order to link up the place he has got to with the country through which he has recently passed. It is equally wise for thinkers occasionally, though not incessantly, to try to fix in retrospect the courses that they have followed and the positions from which they have moved.

A good view of our own proximate origins we cannot get. History begins only when memory's dust has settled. Yesterday's ways of thinking and living are too continuous with the ways in which we think and live today for us to see them clearly. None the less, attempts to trace our proximate origins, though premature as history, are valuable in three ways. Like memoirs, they supply the future historian with those considered and marshalled reminiscences which he will need. Like sketch-maps, they improve their authors' own senses of direction. Like reports of Royal Commissions, they help the student to understand the contemporary scene -- partly by disabusing him of fashionable misconceptions of what is going on.

In introducing this series of lectures, I have three main things to do. First I shall sketch the shape of the social and cultural stage on which have . . .

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