Land and Power: British and Allied Policy on Germany's Frontiers, 1916-19

Land and Power: British and Allied Policy on Germany's Frontiers, 1916-19

Land and Power: British and Allied Policy on Germany's Frontiers, 1916-19

Land and Power: British and Allied Policy on Germany's Frontiers, 1916-19

Excerpt

I seek in this book to contribute to a reappraisal of the peacemaking after the Great War of 1914-1918 by examining one major problem which confronted the Paris Peace Conference in 1919: the territorial settlement with Germany. Since the British role in the peacemaking has been relatively neglected, I have approached the German territorial question primarily, but not exclusively, from the standpoint of British official attitudes and policy. In this respect my purpose is threefold: to discover the pre-conference evolution of British governmental thinking on German boundary issues; to bring out the relationship between British attitudes and those of their allies, especially of the American and French governments; and to determine the British influence on the drafting of the territorial provisions of the ill-fated Treaty of Versailles. While the central theme is British policy, I have chosen to treat the British factor in a broad context, particularly by examining the attitudes and policies of the American, French, and lesser Allies and by attempting a more or less balanced analysis of the territorial negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference. This approach will facilitate, perhaps, a better understanding of both British policy and the general handling of the German territorial problem at that time.

Other aspects of the treatment of the subject probably call for brief comment here. The study concerns only territorial issues directly between the belligerents and not affecting neutrals. The question of Schleswig-Holstein is therefore reserved for separate treatment. In discussing wartime views, I have been concerned mainly with discussions of territorial terms of peace based upon the assumption of decisive Allied victory over Germany. Since the main issues of peacemaking . . .

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