A History of the Great War - Vol. 3

A History of the Great War - Vol. 3

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A History of the Great War - Vol. 3

A History of the Great War - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Fighting around the Ypres Salient--The Canadians attacked--The Training of the New Armies--The "Breaking-point" in War--The Prophylactics against Fear--Death of the younger Moltke.

WHEN the Imperial Crown Prince unleashed his attack on Verdun one part of his purpose was to induce a British counter-offensive. Hence the German lines were not thinned elsewhere; least of all on the British front, where the chief danger was anticipated. The citadel on the Meuse soon became a maelstrom which sucked in all free strategic reserves, and demanded the complete attention of the German Staff. Elsewhere the war seemed to stand still, while the world watched the most heroic and skilful defence that history had known. Verdun was France's exclusive business, and her generals chose to hold the line there with their own troops, and to ask for no reinforcements from the British front. Kitchener at once offered British divisions for the Meuse, but Joffre gratefully declined them. Help, however, was given in another way. The British armies took over the whole line from Ypres to the Somme, and the French Tenth Army, which had held the line from Loos to a point south of Arras, was released for the main battle ground. This was not the only contribution made by the Allies during that long struggle. On 20th April a contingent of Russian troops, some 8,000 strong, landed at Marseilles. They had been brought across Siberia, and then by sea from Dalny, by way of the Suez Canal. Their number could represent no great accession to the . . .

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