The Woman Worker and the Trade Unions

The Woman Worker and the Trade Unions

The Woman Worker and the Trade Unions

The Woman Worker and the Trade Unions

Excerpt

The trade union was developed as an economic instrument of control, an instrument which could be wielded by workers in their own defence in competitive industrial society. Its effectiveness depends upon its inclusiveness, its strength, its ability to match the economic strength of the employing class.

In so far as women workers are a part of the working class of the country, the trade union should be an available instrument for them in their efforts to improve their economic status. The economic status of the majority of women workers in the United States and in most European countries is extremely low, and far below that of men. The labour movements abroad have recognised the seriousness of a large unorganised competitive group of women workers and have persistently and more or less consistently taken them into their union organisations. The labour movement in the United States is becoming increasingly conscious of the ever-growing group of women workers as possible competitors in the economic world. Much . . .

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