History of Japan

History of Japan

History of Japan

History of Japan

Excerpt

The Sengoku Jidai, or the age of the country at war, is the name given to the period from the close of the fifteenth to the end of the sixteenth century, when the daimyō in various provinces struggled with one another for supremacy like so many independent princes. Politically, it was an age of state disintegration, of disunity rather than unity, to all seeming, but actually the fief of each daimyō was destined to constitute an integral part of an organic whole, ready for integration into a feudal system. Culturally and economically, however, the country was not necessarily separated into sections; for artists, religious believers and merchants traveled freely from one part of the country to another, and were not cooped up within the confines of their native provinces. It may have been that the Japanese people in general had not lost the consciousness that their country was one. The ultimate object of each and every daimyō was to go up to Kyōto, the seat of imperial government, to bring the entire country under his sway. Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582) was the first to come very near realizing such an ambition.

Nobunaga, a small daimyō of Owari province (the western part of the Aichi Prefecture of today), steadily . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.