Collected Papers on Latin Literature

Collected Papers on Latin Literature

Collected Papers on Latin Literature

Collected Papers on Latin Literature

Synopsis

This book contains twenty-six articles on a wide range of topics in Latin literature by the eminent scholar and former Professor of Latin at Oxford, Robin Nisbet. Original, stimulating, and at times provocative, this collection represents some of the best in Latin scholarship in recent years.

Excerpt

Robin nisbet's predecessor in the Corpus Christi Chair of Latin Language and Literature at Oxford, Sir Roger Mynors, was once asked why he had produced so few articles. 'It doesn't come out that way,' was the reply. That could have been said by his successor till fifteen or so years ago. He had been a Fellow and Tutor at Corpus Christi College since 1952, and became Corpus Professor in 1970.For twentyfive years his output consisted, almost exclusively, of three major books, the edition with commentary ofCicero In Pisonem (1961), and in 1970 and 1978, the two remarkable commentaries on the first two books of Horace's Odes, fruit of collaboration with Margaret Hubbard. It is only since 1978, and indeed especially within the last six or seven years, that there has been a regular and rich flow of substantial articles.

Scholarly papers often spin off from larger undertakings, but for most of those collected in this volume that is not the case. the occasions repay examination. There is the occasional review; but Nisbet has been sparing in that genre. One (2) is of particular interest; to criticize Eduard Fraenkel's treatment of the text of Petronius in Konrad Müller's edition was a matter requiring tact when the great man was still very present in the Corpus common room. Other occasions were supplied by lectures, to the Virgil Society (7,20) and elsewhere (26), or by invitations to address seminars (21, 25), or to contribute to volumes in honour of friends and colleagues (13, 15, 16, 19, 23). Several papers grew from Nisbet's own graduate classes (4, 9, 11, 13). One is the brilliant taking of a grand opportunity, the chance to give the first account of the new papyrus preserving lines of Cornelius Gallus (6), written in partnership with Peter Parsons next door in Christ Church; it is difficult to feel that much of permanent importance has accrued on that topic since. These impulses to write, and the variety of subject, are the marks of a scholar producing not for the sake of production, but as the outflow or overflow of a scholarly life, lived not in isolation but among colleagues and pupils who valued his opinion and welcomed his contributions.

These are the papers of one who is a leading textual critic. Nisbet practises on the major Latin poets, not afraid to apply the same rigour to the text of Horace that is used more freely on less grand authors. As . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.