Causes and Deterrents of Transportation Accidents: An Analysis by Mode

Causes and Deterrents of Transportation Accidents: An Analysis by Mode

Causes and Deterrents of Transportation Accidents: An Analysis by Mode

Causes and Deterrents of Transportation Accidents: An Analysis by Mode

Synopsis

This book examines causes and deterrents of transportation accidents by mode--automobiles, truck, air, recreational boating, commercial vessels, and railroads--with the focus on accidents in the U.S. The examination enhances our understanding for developing effective multimodal public policies for improving transportation safety. The discussion reveals that the primary cause of accidents in one mode may not be the primary cause in another mode and equally that an effective deterrent for improving safety in one mode may not be an effective deterrent for another mode. The book will be of interest to policy makers and investigators of transportation safety.

Excerpt

Transportation safety issues have received a great deal of attention during the last few decades due to the impact transportation-related accidents have had on fatalities, injuries, and property damage. The costs to individuals, property, and society in general have been significant.

Given the increase in such accidents, various public policies and laws have been enacted and safety devices developed and made available to reduce the risks of accidents and their effects. Many of these policies, laws, and safety devices have been examined for their effectiveness in reducing accidents and/or the effects of accidents. The question of instituting policies and requiring the use of safety devices has been argued vehemently at both local and national levels.

Usually, studies examining the effectiveness of a particular safety policy have been conducted for a single transportation mode in isolation. For example, operator inexperience is a common factor contributing to accidents in all modes of transportation. Yet the inferences made on the impact of the experience factor and the possible policy actions suggested to address this issue for one mode of transportation are generally not extended to other modes. As such, researchers investigating the effects of the experience factor on airline accidents may not be aware of similar studies in the trucking industry. Another example concerns studies of the effects of alcohol consumption by automobile drivers on highway accidents. It is agreed that alcohol and driving automobiles do not mix. One could easily infer that alcohol consumption and operating a recreational boat also do not mix. However, while the policy of selecting a . . .

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