Handbook of Political Science Research on Latin America: Trends from the 1960s to the 1990s

Handbook of Political Science Research on Latin America: Trends from the 1960s to the 1990s

Handbook of Political Science Research on Latin America: Trends from the 1960s to the 1990s

Handbook of Political Science Research on Latin America: Trends from the 1960s to the 1990s

Synopsis

"The volume offers a rich synthesis of political science research on Latin America over the past 30 years and offers a wealth of information to anyone interested in the area--from the beginning student to the area specialist. . . . The volume is an impressive achievement and will not outdate soon." Library Journal (starred review)

Excerpt

This book is the outgrowth of close to fifteen years of work as a contributing editor to the government and politics literature found in the Handbook of Latin American Studies, a standard reference bibliography covering all aspects of research on Latin America. My original goal was to utilize the existing contributors to the Handbook to produce a reference work that would synthesize the research trends in the field of Latin American politics since 1960. This turned out to be unrealistic given the heavy research and writing commitments of some contributors and the division of labor employed by the Handbook of Latin American Studies at the Library of Congress. To produce this reference handbook, I relied on sixteen scholars who have been key contributors to the study of Latin American politics in the United States and Latin America. All of the contributors to this volume have lived and done field work in Latin America and the Caribbean and have studied and taught about Latin America for a good part of their lives. Many have been involved in the major debates over how to best approach the politics of the region and how to better understand the international relations of our neighbors to the south. Seven of the contributors are current or former contributors to the Handbook of Latin American Studies where they review and annotate the government and politics or international relations materials that are sent to them by the staff at the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress.

Political science research on Latin America did not reach the "takeoff" stage until the early 1960s when the growth of the profession coincided with the Cuban Revolution and the Alliance for Progress. At the time there were very few trained political scientists writing about Latin America; those who were interested in Latin American affairs were mostly historians or journalists from the United States. the "political science" literature from Latin America consisted largely of ministerial reports and partisan tracks by Latin American intellectuals or . . .

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