Botany for Young People and Common Schools: How Plants Grow, a Simple Introduction to Structural Botany: with a Popular Flora, or an Arrangement and Description of Common Plants, Both Wild and Cultivated

Botany for Young People and Common Schools: How Plants Grow, a Simple Introduction to Structural Botany: with a Popular Flora, or an Arrangement and Description of Common Plants, Both Wild and Cultivated

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Botany for Young People and Common Schools: How Plants Grow, a Simple Introduction to Structural Botany: with a Popular Flora, or an Arrangement and Description of Common Plants, Both Wild and Cultivated

Botany for Young People and Common Schools: How Plants Grow, a Simple Introduction to Structural Botany: with a Popular Flora, or an Arrangement and Description of Common Plants, Both Wild and Cultivated

Read FREE!

Excerpt

154. PLANTS not only grow so as to increase in size or extent, but also multiply, or increase their numbers. This they do at such a rate that almost any species, if favorably situated, and not interfered with by other plants or by animals, would soon cover the whole face of a country adapted to its life.

155. Plants multiply in two distinct ways, namely, by Buds and by Seeds . All plants propagate by seeds, or by what answer to seeds. Besides this, a great number of plants, mostly perennials, propagate naturally from buds.

156. And almost any kind of plant may be made to propagate from buds, by taking sufficient pains. The gardener multiplies plants artificially in this way,

157. By Layers and Slips or Cuttings. In laying or layering , the gardener bends a branch down to the ground, -- sometimes cutting a notch at the bend, or removing a ring of bark, to make it strike root the quicker, -- and covers it with earth; then, after it has rooted, he cuts off the connection with the parent stem. Thus he makes artificial stolons (99). Plants which strike root still more readily, such as Willows, he propagates by cuttings or slips, that is, by pieces of stem, containing one or more buds, thrust into the ground or into flower-pots. If kept moist and warm enough, they will generally strike root from the cut end in the ground, and develop a bud above, so forming a new plant out of a piece of an old one. Many woody plants, which will not so readily grow from slips, can often be multiplied

158. By Grafting or Budding. In grafting , the cutting is inserted into a stem or branch of another plant of the same species, or of some species like it, as of the Pear into the Quince or Apple; where it grows and forms a branch of the stock (as the stem used to graft on is called). The piece inserted is called a scion. In grafting shrubs and trees it is needful to make the inner bark and the edge of the wood of the scion correspond with these parts in the stock, when they will grow together, and become as completely united as a natural branch is with its parent stem. In budding or inoculating , a young bud, stripped from one fresh plant, is inserted under the bark of another, usually in summer; there it adheres and gen-

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