The Cold War, a Study in U.S. Foreign Policy

The Cold War, a Study in U.S. Foreign Policy

The Cold War, a Study in U.S. Foreign Policy

The Cold War, a Study in U.S. Foreign Policy

Excerpt

An anonymous article on The Sources of Soviet Conduct appeared in the quarterly journal Foreign Affairs for July 1947 and shortly afterwards it was republished by Life magazine. By its quality alone it would have commanded wide attention. For it was manifestly the work of a man who had observed the Soviet regime closely with a trained eye and an educated mind, and had arrived at a theory as to why the conduct of the Soviet government reflects "no abstract love of peace and stability, no real faith in the possibility of a permanent happy co-existence of the socialist and capitalist worlds, but rather a continuous, persistent pressure towards the disruption and weakening of all rival influence and rival power."

Almost immediately several of the leading correspondents in Washington identified the author, who signed himself "X," as being Mr. George F. Kennan who, after a tour of duty at the Embassy in Moscow, had recently been appointed by Secretary Marshall to be the Director of the Policy Planning Staff of the Department of State. The attribution was not denied. After that Mr. X's article was no longer just one more report on the Soviet regime and what to do about it. It was an event, announcing that the Department of State had made up its mind, and was prepared to disclose to the American people, to the world at large, and of course also to the Kremlin the estimates, the calculations, and the conclusions on which the Department was basing its plans.

Mr. X's article is, therefore, not only an analytical interpre-

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