Common Law in Southern Africa: Conflict of Laws and Torts Precedents

Common Law in Southern Africa: Conflict of Laws and Torts Precedents

Common Law in Southern Africa: Conflict of Laws and Torts Precedents

Common Law in Southern Africa: Conflict of Laws and Torts Precedents

Synopsis

This is the first major text on the topic of Southern African Law written for use in common law countries. The book identifies judgments in Southern African courts that are significant for their treatment of conflicts and tort issues and can serve as authorities or models in common law jurisdictions. The most important legislative reforms in related subjects are also described. This text provides lawyers in common law countries access to the Southern African cases and statutes most pertinent to questions of conflict laws and torts that arise in common law jurisdiction.

Excerpt

The sole responsibility for the contents of this book is mine, but writing the book would have been neither feasible nor rewarding without the assistance and encouragement of numerous individuals and institutions.

My principal acknowledgement must be to the University of Cape Town Faculty of Law. I am very grateful not only for the Faculty's generosity in providing office, secretarial and library facilities to an overseas visitor for eleven months, but also for the assistance and friendship extended to me by the academic and non- academic staff. I valued the opportunity to be a de facto colleague of the able academics in the Faculty of Law and learned much from them. (Inevitably some passages in this book will show that there are things about Southern African law that I should have learned but did not. No one at U.C.T. is responsible for this.)

Also:

The University of Oklahoma College of Law, which granted the sabbatical during which much of the book was written.

The Faculties of Law of Monash University and the University of Edinburgh, which generously provided office and library facilities and thus assisted my research for several projects, including this one.

The librarians and library staff members--particularly at the law libraries of the University of Cape Town, Monash University, the University of Oklahoma and the Bodleian Library, Oxford--who were tremendously helpful in enabling me to use the collections of their libraries and to locate and obtain materials from other libraries.

Denise Greyling, who while a student in the University of Cape Town Faculty of Law served ably as my research assistant and translated judgments published in Afrikaans.

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