Intercolonial Aspects of American Culture on the Eve of the Revolution

Intercolonial Aspects of American Culture on the Eve of the Revolution

Intercolonial Aspects of American Culture on the Eve of the Revolution

Intercolonial Aspects of American Culture on the Eve of the Revolution

Excerpt

A well known caricature of Lord Byron shaking the dust of England off his clothes is somewhat suggestive of an older style of American historiography. Under the influence of the Revolutionary heritage an author was, perhaps, wont to take especial pride in pointing out that the colonies grew up in a new environment, depending on their own resources seemingly apart from the rest of the world.

Time and a better historical perspective have served to draw a truer picture of colonial conditions, emphasizing the position of the American colonies in the scheme of the British empire. The work of a number of scholars in the past thirty years has made plain the relations of the colonies to England and the rest of the empire, in what was essentially, from the ministerial point of view, a great commercial organization. Yet despite this recent emphasis on eighteenth-century imperial relations, other phases of English contact with her American colonies are still very much in the shadow or buried away in obscure articles and little known studies. While we know now a great deal about political relations and commercial regulations, we know much less about the communication of political ideas or actual commercial relations. For example, not a great deal has been done to show the volume of trade with the colonies, its composition, how it was carried, the trade routes and the means and methods of payment. These are all important as shedding much light on many of the political questions that arose between 1760 and 1775 and the . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.