An Introduction to Latent Variable Growth Curve Modeling: Concepts, Issues, and Applications

An Introduction to Latent Variable Growth Curve Modeling: Concepts, Issues, and Applications

An Introduction to Latent Variable Growth Curve Modeling: Concepts, Issues, and Applications

An Introduction to Latent Variable Growth Curve Modeling: Concepts, Issues, and Applications

Excerpt

This volume presents a statistical method, known as Latent Variable Growth Curve Modeling, for analyzing repeated measures. Although a number of readers may be unfamiliar with Latent Growth Modeling (LGM), it is likely that most have already mastered many of the method's underpinnings, inasmuch as repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) models are special cases of LGMs that focus only on the factor means. In contrast, a fully expanded latent growth curve analysis takes into account both factor means and variances. This combination of individual and group levels of analysis is unique to the LGM procedure. LGMs are also variants of the standard linear structural model. In addition to using regression coefficients and variances and covariances of the independent variables, they incorporate a mean structure into the model. LGMs strongly resemble the classic confirmatory factor analysis. However, because they use repeated measures raw-score data, the latent factors are interpreted as chronometric common factors representing individual differences over time. The book is written with two major themes--concepts and issues, and applications--and is designed to take advantage of the reader's familiarity with ANOVA and standard structural equation modeling (SEM) procedures in introducing LGM techniques and presenting practical examples. Mathematically sophisticated readers may want to study more advanced treatments of this subject in Meredith andTisak (1990) or Tisak andMeredith (1990). To estimate the LGM, it is necessary to use current standards in estimation and testing procedures found in SEM programs such as LISREL (Jöreskog &Sörbom, 1993), Mx (Neale, 1995), Amos (Arbuckle, 1995), and EQS (Bentler &Wu, 1995). Examples are provided using EQS, with supplemental notation for Amos and LISREL programs.

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