The Black Market: A Study of White Collar Crime

The Black Market: A Study of White Collar Crime

The Black Market: A Study of White Collar Crime

The Black Market: A Study of White Collar Crime

Excerpt

Some fifteen years have elapsed since the first appearance of this study of the World War II black market, or illegal behavior in the form of price and rationing violations. Written originally as a study of white collar crime, it has come to be regarded as a significant contribution to criminological theory, to the study of law in action, and to the general social and economic history of the war period. For those with an interest in deviant behavior and social problems, it analyzes some of the value conflicts confronting people in higher-status positions who are caught between the state regulation of commercial transactions and the business values of a free-enterprise system. The study of white collar crime thus brings into focus the relationships among criminal behavior, criminal law, penal sanctions, and the social structure.

"White collar crime" is a term which denotes lawbreaking in the middle and upper ("white collar") socio-economic classes. This type of criminal behavior differs from the conventional criminal behavior committed by lower socio-economic groups and is subject to different types of sanctions. The concept of white collar crime is a relatively new addition to criminological theory. Although the need for a term to cover such illegal behavior was suggested in 1907 by one of the founders of American sociology, E. A. Ross, and reaffirmed by Morris in the 1930's, it was not until 1940 that the distinguished criminologist E. H. Sutherland coined the term in a paper. Later (in 1949), Sutherland published the first major study in the area, called White Collar Crime. An effort has recently been made by Quinney and Clinard to introduce the broader notion of "occupational crime," i.e., violations of law in connection with one's occupational role regardless of social status, while retaining the term "white collar crime" as a designation lim-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.