The American Metropolis

The American Metropolis

The American Metropolis

The American Metropolis

Excerpt

There was a time when the citizen interested in learning about the government and politics of our cities read a book or took a course on "Municipal Government." It was appropriate for him to do so for most of the activities involved in governing our cities were the responsibility of municipal governments, with possibly some occasional help (or hindrance) from the state. A study of municipal government will still tell one much about the governing of our cities, but increasingly it is only a part of the picture. One of the two general themes emphasized in the first edition of this book was that the governing of our major cities and metropolitan areas is essentially an intergovernmental or multigovernmental process. It involves governments at all levels-- local, county, state, and national--and the developing patterns of cooperation and conflict among these governments are one of the most important facets of the governmental process in metropolitan areas. That theme continues to be emphasized here.

The second general theme is that the process of governing urban areas is a political process, and at several points in the work some discussion is devoted to what is meant by the term "political process." We have defined politics here as conflict over public policy. One of the political characteristics of local government has been the continual attempt to "depoliticize" the local political process through such means as nonpartisan elections and the council-manager plan. Many times these reforms have had a most beneficial effect, but the point made throughout the book is that while such reforms may change the form of the local political process they do not eliminate politics from the process.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.