A Woman Rice Planter

A Woman Rice Planter

A Woman Rice Planter

A Woman Rice Planter

Excerpt

The culture of rice in what is now the United States was first undertaken in Virginia, but the first successful planting of the crop occurred in South Carolina in the latter half of the seventeenth century. Although cultivation of this crop spread soon to North Carolina and Georgia, and later to Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, South Carolina produced from sixty to eighty per cent of the rice grown in this country down to the end of the Civil War. The emancipation of the slaves and other causes led to a gradual decline of interest in the crop after 1865; and, at the present day, South Carolina has altogether abandoned the production of rice. The book here reproduced recounts the heroic efforts, over a four-year period beginning in 1903, of the daughter of one of the outstanding ante-bellum South Carolina rice planters to carry on the culture of the crop on the ancestral lands, using free labor, most of the laborers being descendants of her father's former slaves. That her efforts ended in failure need not be attributed to a lack of knowledge of planting procedures or want of diligence in management or of perseverance, but rather to economic, geographic, and human factors over which she had no control. A basis for understanding this failure may be found in a brief survey of the history of the rice industry as it was carried on in the ante-bellum South and of developments within the industry since 1865.

After some years of experimentation when the crop was . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.