Education for Work

Education for Work

Education for Work

Education for Work

Excerpt

Each year, approximately 150,000 to 200,000 pupils in secondary schools in New York State terminate their formal education. Nearly all of these secondary school pupils face eventually the problem of earning a living. Under our economic system, individuals are required to produce goods and services in exchange for the means of supporting themselves. "One's job," to quote the Lynds, "is the watershed down which the rest of one's life tends to flow." Today, many of these young people in New York State are finding it extremely difficult to procure employment. In New York City in 1935 the Welfare Council found that one-third of the young people investigated were unemployed youth, sixteen to twenty-four years of age, out of school, able to work, desirous of employment but unable to obtain it. Similar situations are found in other communities.

In an attempt to face this problem of earning a living, youth is confronted by the task of adjusting itself as best it can to the economic system, and, in this adjustment process, must by one means or another secure the training that will assist it in meeting the situation. At times it may even be confronted by an economic condition that does not provide opportunities for employment. Because of this situation, the difficulties which youth faces cannot be attributed entirely either to education or to lack of education; the economic system must bear its share of the responsibility. On the other hand, the school cannot place the entire blame on our economic struc-

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