Alexander of Yugoslavia: The Story of the King Who Was Murdered at Marseilles

Alexander of Yugoslavia: The Story of the King Who Was Murdered at Marseilles

Alexander of Yugoslavia: The Story of the King Who Was Murdered at Marseilles

Alexander of Yugoslavia: The Story of the King Who Was Murdered at Marseilles

Excerpt

HIDE yourself, you gipsy! But it does not matter where you go, we will find you and kill you."

So wrote Pavelich in April, 1934, in one of the propaganda sheets printed abroad at his expense. He called the King a gipsy because the dynasty of Karageorgevich is descended from an obscure family which had migrated to Shumadia from the Montenegrin border and directly from a cattle drover and trader known as Black George, Kara Jorj . This original Black George took the surname of Petrovich because his father's name was Peter. He drove pigs to market. He was fully armed and prepared to defend the swine with his life. He became a haidzik. There were episodes in his early life which show him as a raider and the sworn foe of Turks, several of whom he killed before he became a leader of men and led the Serbs in victorious revolt against their masters. The people of the Dinaric Alps where his ancestors lived are a blend. There is Turkish blood, there is Albanian, Montenegrin, Greek. But the type of the Karageorgevich family is predominantly Slav. Alexander, a proud man who never begged of anyone, a brave soldier, and a man who despised mere wealth, a man with no taste for a vagabond life -- he could hardly be thought to be descended from a gipsy.

But Pavelich was angry. In December, 1933, he had . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.