Non-Partisan League

Non-Partisan League

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Non-Partisan League

Non-Partisan League

Read FREE!

Excerpt

SOONER or later it was inevitable that there should be a rebellion, and that there should be an attack on corporate control and a demand for home rule. It was also not to be expected that this rebellion should always be altruistic and always be wisely led, but that in it, as in all other revolutions, the demagogue and the political profiteer would see his opportunity and would play his part.

The first uprising was in 1892. Its immediate cause was the veto by Governor Andrew H. Burke of a bill which was favored by the Farmers' Alliance and which sought to compel the railroads to lease sites on their rights of way for grain elevators and warehouses. The result was a fusion of the Farmers' Alliance, the Populists and the Democrats and the election of Eli C. B. Shortridge as governor. During this administration a small appropriation was made for the construction of a terminal elevator at Duluth. Perhaps on account of the panic of 1893 and perhaps for other reasons nothing further was done to promote the venture and the rebellion itself was terminated in 1894 by the election of the regular Republican candidate, Roger Allin.

The real revolution came in 1906. Its success was largely due to the activities of three men, George Winship who was the editor and owner of the Grand Forks Herald , which was by far the most influential paper in the state; Burleigh F. Spalding, who was a trained and . . .

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