Law and Business of the Sports Industries: Common Issues in Amateur and Professional Sports - Vol. 2

Law and Business of the Sports Industries: Common Issues in Amateur and Professional Sports - Vol. 2

Law and Business of the Sports Industries: Common Issues in Amateur and Professional Sports - Vol. 2

Law and Business of the Sports Industries: Common Issues in Amateur and Professional Sports - Vol. 2

Synopsis

First issued in 1986, this volume and its companion on professional sports leagues were soon recognized as ideal sources for the sports law practitioner. Now, in a thoroughly revised and updated version, this book continues to identify the most significant and current cases in amateur sports, providing extensive analysis and interpretation of each case in a clear, readable, and lively style.

Excerpt

The scope and power of amateur athletic organizations in the United States and worldwide have expanded tremendously over the past quarter century. In the United States, amateur athletic organizations are part of the lives of many people from childhood (for example, Pop Warner Football and Little League Baseball), through the high school years (for example, the National Federation of State High School Associations), through college (for example, the National Collegiate Athletic Association), and beyond (for example, the United States Olympic Committee). The financial stakes in amateur athletics have also increased dramatically, and the constituencies involved -- athlete, coach, institution, and amateur organization -- are all affected by the pressures associated with "grabbing a piece of the pie." As a result, there has been a dramatic increase in litigation as these constituencies feel the various pressures and fight to survive.

The early 1990s are seeing the emergence of subcommittees in existing national organizations as well as new organizations whose purpose is to study the problems inherent in athletics. In 1989 the Knight Commission was formed to study abuses in athletics -- which had reached proportions threatening the very integrity of higher education -- and was directed to propose a reform agenda for intercollegiate athletics. The Olympic Overview Commission was formed after the lack of medals won by U.S. athletes in the 1988 Winter Olympic Games in Calgary. The commission was created to examine the activities of the United States Olympic Committee in an attempt to streamline operations in order to provide more financial support to the athletes.

The purpose of this chapter is to give the reader a sense of the extent of amateur athletics in the United States, the structure and involvement of national amateur athletic organizations, and the financial impact of these organizations in the world of athletics. This overview will provide the reader with a base of knowledge about the three major amateur athletic constituencies addressed in this book: college athletics, Olympic athletics, and high school athletics. The first section of this chapter, Section 1.10, will provide a brief description of some amateur athletic associations in the college, Olympic, and high school athletic areas. Section 1.20 will present an analysis of the economics of amateur athletics, including financial information in the areas of college, Olympic, and high school athletics. The next . . .

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