Labor and Democracy

Labor and Democracy

Labor and Democracy

Labor and Democracy

Excerpt

In my earliest recollections, the day began when father took his lunch bucket and went to the mine where he stayed all day, and ended with an evening meal by lamplight followed by bed. In the intervening hours came play but with only such playthings as we could devise, and then school. School I liked--my mind was active and I made my way easily through such books as were available. Our school like all our houses was bare, for ours was a mining village which provided scanty resources. My father, an English coal miner, had brought his Welsh bride to Coshocton in 1870, hoping for a better life in the New World. As was his habit in England, he joined the union and attended union meetings regularly. We children in the home associated work with the union as a matter of course. Practically everybody in our little community worked in the mines or was employed by the coal company. The children of our household played with children of other miners' families, and all of our homes were alike. Sometimes we were cold and did not have enough to eat. Our home was without comforts and there were not enough beds for us all to sleep comfortably. We never heard any complaining about the necessity for work, only thankfulness when work was steady and income dependable. At the best father's income provided only necessaries.

Life in our mining town was simple and its only . . .

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