Two Great Scouts and Their Pawnee Battalion: The Experiences of Frank J. North and Luther H. North, Pioneers in the Great West, 1856-1882, and Their Defence of the Building of the Union Pacific Railroad

Two Great Scouts and Their Pawnee Battalion: The Experiences of Frank J. North and Luther H. North, Pioneers in the Great West, 1856-1882, and Their Defence of the Building of the Union Pacific Railroad

Two Great Scouts and Their Pawnee Battalion: The Experiences of Frank J. North and Luther H. North, Pioneers in the Great West, 1856-1882, and Their Defence of the Building of the Union Pacific Railroad

Two Great Scouts and Their Pawnee Battalion: The Experiences of Frank J. North and Luther H. North, Pioneers in the Great West, 1856-1882, and Their Defence of the Building of the Union Pacific Railroad

Synopsis

From 1864 until 1877, the Pawnee Scouts, a unique U. S. Army battalion of about a hundred Pawnees, were scouts and soldiers during the height of the Plains Indian wars and earned the respect of prominent generals in the West, including George Crook, Eugene Carr, and Ranald Mackenzie. They were commanded by the famous "fighting Norths". Originally published in 1928, Two Great Scouts and Their Pawnee Battalion is based upon Luther's firsthand recollections. The Pawnee Scouts and the Norths helped protect the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad, scouted for the Connor Expedition in 1865 and along the Republican River in 1866, fought the Cheyennes at the Battle of Plum Creek, directed the Carr Expedition that led to the destruction of the Cheyenne Dog Soldier village at Summit Springs, fought in Crook's Campaign against Dull Knife in 1876-77, and assisted with the campaign following Custer's defeat.

Excerpt

About the middle of the last century a large part of our country west of the Mississippi river was known as the Far West. It lay beyond areas reached by railroads and was quite unknown. Except for a few trading posts and military forts it was without white residents. Yet there were roads through it, the California and Oregon trail for emigrants and the Santa Fé trail, a commercial route to Mexico. Besides, it had been traversed in many directions by the trappers of the beaver -- the first explorers of the west. Those who passed through it in search of fur, however, seldom set down the details of their journeyings, and up to the latter part of the nineteenth century much of the region was unexplored.

Transportation in that Far West was very different from the transportation of today. Other than on foot, there were two methods of travel -- on horseback or by wagon. Baggage and freight were carried in wagons hauled by oxen, mules or horses, where wheeled vehicles could be used. Individuals rode on horseback. This horseback riding was serious work. The journeys made by the traveler covered hundreds of miles and he was obliged to ride the same horse, day after day. This horse subsisted on the prairie grass picked up between the end of one day's ride and the beginning of the next day. To endure this continuous work, it was necessary that the horse be kept in good condition. For this reason, the . . .

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