The Intellectual Crisis in American Public Administration

The Intellectual Crisis in American Public Administration

The Intellectual Crisis in American Public Administration

The Intellectual Crisis in American Public Administration

Excerpt

Many years of teaching and research have contributed to this effort to reconsider the intellectual foundations for both the study and practice of public administration. My graduate education in public administration was in the traditional mainstream. Leonard White Introduction was the basic text in my first introduction to the subject.

While on the faculty at the University of Wyoming, I became interested in the development of public organizations associated with water-supply and land-use problems in the and regions of the American West. I gave serious thought to writing a dissertation on politics and grass as a study of institutional and policy developments associated with public land management. When I decided to return to Los Angeles to begin the dissertation, I shifted my focus to the fashioning of water policies and institutions in the development of Los Angeles and the southern California metropolitan region.

The traditional theory of administration was not very helpful in understanding the different forms of public organization that were created to provide water supplies and manage public lands in the and West. The works of John W. Powell, Elwood Mead, William Hammond Hall, Frederick Jackson Turner, Walter Prescott Webb, and Samuel Wiel were more helpful.

At the University of Oregon, I became associate director of the Cooperation Program in Educational Administration for the Pacifc Northwest region. The CPEA was funded by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation to improve graduate education in educa-

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