Teaching and Learning Computer Programming: Multiple Research Perspectives

Teaching and Learning Computer Programming: Multiple Research Perspectives

Teaching and Learning Computer Programming: Multiple Research Perspectives

Teaching and Learning Computer Programming: Multiple Research Perspectives

Synopsis

The influx of computer technology into classrooms during the past decade raises the questions -- how can we teach children to use computers productively and what effect will learning to program computers have on them? During this same period, researchers have investigated novice learning of computer programming.

Teaching and Learning Computer Programming unites papers and perspectives by respected researchers of teaching and learning computer science while it summarizes and integrates major theoretical and empirical contributions. It gives a current and concise account of how instructional techniques affect student learning and how learning of programming affects students' cognitive skills.

This collection is an ideal supplementary text for students and a valuable reference for professionals and researchers of education, technology and psychology, computer science, communication, developmental psychology, and industrial organization.

Excerpt

During the decade of the 1980s, computers have become a part of schooling for millions of children, and instruction in programming has increasingly become a part of the curriculum. How can we teach children to use computers productively and what will be the effect on children of learning to program computers? These are the research questions addressed in Teaching and Learning Computer Programming: Multiple Research Perspectives.

Ten years ago there was an insufficient research base to answer these questions, but during the past decade researchers have begun to investigate novices' learning of computer programming. This book brings together some of the most productive researchers in the field and asks each to summarize what research says about teaching and learning computer programming. The result is a concise and current account of how instructional techniques affect student learning and how learning of programming affects students' cognitive skills.

In my role as editor, I asked each author to show how research answers two general questions: What kinds of instruction enable students to learn programming productively? What are the cognitive consequences of learning programming languages? In other words, I asked each author to address the two topics in this book's title -- teaching and learning. Similarly, as the subtitle indicates, I asked each author to examine these topics from his or her own research perspective and to provide integrative summaries of relevant research.

As an aid in preparing their chapters, authors exchanged ideas at a "Symposium on Research on Teaching and Learning Computer Programming" held in April of 1987 in Washington, DC. With the exception of one chapter which was reprinted in updated form from refereed sources, each chapter was subjected to peer review and an extensive editorial revision cycle. In the interests of readability, I instructed authors to present chapters in a common format, including . . .

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