Thrasymachus, Or, the Future of Morals

Thrasymachus, Or, the Future of Morals

Thrasymachus, Or, the Future of Morals

Thrasymachus, Or, the Future of Morals

Excerpt

Thrasymachus appears in the first book of Plato Republic , in which the speakers discuss the nature of Justice. Several tentative definitions of Justice are given, which Socrates has no difficulty in showing to be inadequate by the peculiarly irritating methods of dialectic for which the Athenians so excusably poisoned him. Thrasymachus then breaks in. He is a blustering, overbearing personage, who makes long speeches instead of answering Socrates' questions, and, when driven into a corner, charges the latter rather irrelevantly with having a bad cold and omitting to use his handkerchief.

Required to sustain an unpopular thesis, he is not unnaturally represented as an offensive person. The trick is an old one and argues well for Plato's sense of dramatic fitness. It should not, however, blind us to the plausibility of . . .

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