England & America: Rivals in the American Revolution

England & America: Rivals in the American Revolution

England & America: Rivals in the American Revolution

England & America: Rivals in the American Revolution

Excerpt

Sir George Watson, the founder of the chair which makes possible these lectures on American History and Institutions, was doubtless well aware of the prevailing English indifference, even aversion, to study of the life and past experiences of the great republic of the New World. Perhaps he did not fully appreciate the difficulty of making the British public drink at the Pierian spring. Whatever his vision or amiable delusion, he did a noble thing in a generous way, and hoped, as do all idealists, for a great attainment. At the present day, however, a vastly greater number of Americans are listening with interest to what English lecturers are saying about British history and imperial problems than there are Englishmen who care to try to understand the historical past and national problems of America. There must be a greater parity in the efforts to comprehend each other, if the two great English-speaking peoples are ever to reach that mutual understanding in which all men of vision see the best hope of world peace and democratic progress.

If the British public listens only to a senatorial voice from Idaho, or an even more strident one . . .

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