Forty Years a Fur Trader on the Upper Missouri: The Personal Narrative of Charles Larpenteur, 1833-1872

Forty Years a Fur Trader on the Upper Missouri: The Personal Narrative of Charles Larpenteur, 1833-1872

Forty Years a Fur Trader on the Upper Missouri: The Personal Narrative of Charles Larpenteur, 1833-1872

Forty Years a Fur Trader on the Upper Missouri: The Personal Narrative of Charles Larpenteur, 1833-1872

Excerpt

The publishers of The Lakeside Classics have chosen as the content of this year's volume a story of the fur trade as carried on in the Upper Missouri Valley during the middle of the last century.

St. Louis has always been the base for fur trading in the territory beyond the Mississippi. In 1762 two New Orleans merchants founded the firm of Maxent, Laclede and Company, and chose the present site of St. Louis as the location for their trading post. As the post grew into a settlement, a town, and finally into a city, it continued to be the principal trading center of the frontier, and even today its semi-annual fur auctions are the largest in America.

Larpenteur's narrative gives a frank picture of the treatment of the Indians by the fur traders operating under American influences, which contrasts strongly with that of such traders as Henry, Long, Mackenzie and Hubbard, all of whom operated from Mackinaw as a base. The Mackinaw trader had developed what we, struggling in . . .

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