The Development of Modern Europe: An Introduction to the Study of Current History - Vol. 2

The Development of Modern Europe: An Introduction to the Study of Current History - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

The Development of Modern Europe: An Introduction to the Study of Current History - Vol. 2

The Development of Modern Europe: An Introduction to the Study of Current History - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

THE RESTORATION IN FRANCE AND THE REVOLUTION OF 1830

49. When, in 1792, the Austrian and Prussian armies had advanced toward Paris with the object of freeing Louis XVI from the restrictions placed upon him by the National Assembly, the French, roused to fury, had deposed and executed a ruler who was convicted of plotting with foreign powers to maintain his authority. In 1814 the allies placed on the throne the brother of Louis XVI, a veteran emigré, who had openly derided the Revolution and had been intriguing with other European powers for nearly twenty years to gain the French crown. Yet there was no demonstration of anger on the part of the nation, no organized opposition to the new king. The French were still monarchical at heart and had quietly submitted to the rule of Napoleon, which was no less despotic than that of Louis XIV.

The French do not oppose the restoration of the Bourbons in 1814

There was, however, no danger that Louis XVIII would undo the great work of the Revolution and of Napoleon. He was no fanatic like his younger brother, the count of Artois. In his youth he had delighted in Voltaire and the writings of the philosophers; he had little sympathy for the Church party, and six years' residence in England had given him some notion of liberal institutions. His sixty years, his corpulence, his gout,

Louis XVIII is not tempted to undo the work of Napoleon and the Revolution . . .

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