The Legacy of Alan Turing - Vol. 1

The Legacy of Alan Turing - Vol. 1

The Legacy of Alan Turing - Vol. 1

The Legacy of Alan Turing - Vol. 1

Synopsis

This is the second of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing; it celebrates his intellectual legacy within the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. A distinguished international cast of contributors focus on the relationship beteen a scientific, computational image of the mind and a common-sense picture of the mind as an inner arena populated by concepts, beliefs, intentions, and qualia. Topics covered include the causal potency of folk- psychological states, the connectionist reconception of learning and concept formation, the understanding of the notion of computation itself, and the relation between philosophical and psychological theories of concepts.

Excerpt

Peter Millican

This is the first of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing. It is centred on the continuing discussion of his classic contributions to the theory of artificial intelligence and computer science, and in particular, the three most fundamental and seminal ideas universally associated with his name: the Turing Test, the Turing machine, and the Church-Turing thesis.

The Turing Test was first proposed in a paper that was to become amongst philosophers (or at least those not specializing in logic and computation) Turing's easily best-known work: 'Computing Machinery and Intelligence', published in Mind in 1950. It was the fortieth anniversary of this publication that brought together, at the Turing 1990 Colloquium, the impressive interdisciplinary array of speakers and distinguished invited guests whose contributions, both at the Colloquium itself and subsequently, form the heart of these two volumes. the level of discussion at the Colloquium was such as to lead a number of the contributors to wish substantially to revise or extend their papers, and given the significance of the occasion, the relatively timeless nature of much of the subject- matter, and the unusual opportunity for mutual response between researchers across a variety of disciplines, it seemed appropriate to delay immediate publication for this purpose. We hope that this has allowed these collections, though conceived at the Turing Colloquium 1990, to be more than just another conference proceedings, albeit one with an unusually impressive cast of contributors. Among that cast, it is particularly gratifying to be able to include two of the earliest and most influential pioneers of artificial intelligence, Donald Michie (who worked side by side with Turing, codebreaking at Bletchley Park) and the Nobel laureate Herbert Simon, and also Turing's doctoral student Robin Gandy.

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